Tag Archives: dark souls

Review – You Died

I’ve written about Dark Souls here before, but I’ve never adequately expressed how much I adore the game. Dark Souls isn’t my favourite game, but it’s one of the few I find endlessly fascinating. I watch a few of the community’s personalities dissect the lore, I read wikis, the subreddit and follow the parts of the game which are still being uncovered and still being reported despite the game’s approaching fifth (!) birthday. This is all to say that reading You Died: The Dark Souls Companion by Keza MacDonald and Jason Killingsworth has been a delight for me. The book ably combines personal stories of the authors’ experience with Dark Souls, interviews with community members prominent and unknown and serious discussion with people involved in the game’s development, such as its English translator. Given the range of material You Died covers, it’s an astonishingly successful book, among the finest tributes to one of the greatest games ever made.

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Why I Love: Lorian & Lothric

Lorian & Lothric are bound to be Dark Souls III’s most controversial boss. You’ll call Lorian’s teleportation ‘cheap’ or ‘impossible to beat’ and die to it without really understanding it. You’ll hurl a controller across the room when you find out that you need to go back through phase one of Lorian’s fight to activate Lothric, even if you’ve beaten it before. And then, just when you think you’ve dodged the beam from Lorian’s sword you’ll be hit by Lothric’s magic homing arrow and keel over a few yards from victory. By the time you beat the boss, though, you’ll hopefully have an appreciation for its fantastic, fascinating design. The best Dark Souls bosses are those which at first appear impossible but, gradually, retry by retry, reveal weaknesses and openings and predictable patterns to exploit. Lorian & Lothric are Dark Souls III’s finest boss, and among the best bosses of the whole series.

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Dark Souls III Impressions

Dark Souls III is the first From Software game I’ve played at launch. I’ve yet to play Dark Souls II, and in the case of both Dark Souls and Bloodborne I played them long after they released. In the tutorial area, there were fifty bloodstains leading up to the optional crystal monster fight which, like the message telling players to turn back, only enticed me to fight it (and die six times). Playing a Souls game with a procession of players fighting and dying in the same areas as me has been a delight. After four hours, I want to discuss how playing a Souls game changes at launch and share some initial impressions.

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Dark Souls’ Problem with Strength Builds

This post contains gameplay spoilers for the final sections of Dark Souls and Bloodborne. If you haven’t played either, I highly recommend doing so and reading this after.

I submit the soul of one of Dark Souls’ final few bosses, the Four Kings, to the Lord Vessel. That opens the game’s last area, a long path to the final boss, Lord Gwyn. Dark Souls has a reputation for being difficult which can sometimes be overstated, but I was understandably nervous about the climactic battle in a game packed full of really tough boss fights. From Software even emphasise the magnitude of the fight through level design here, since the whole area slopes towards Gwyn’s chamber which is visible from minutes away. When I arrive at Gwyn though, I’m disappointed. Visually he looks great, the boss arena is wonderful, and his moves are suitably intimidating. He isn’t a badly designed boss like the Bed of Chaos or the Capra Demon, both of which will almost always kill the player once. Instead, my problem is that he’s easy. When Gwyn swings his sword, I can absorb the blow and attack through, literally trading hits with him. I take a more substantial chunk of damage than him, of course, but I also have the ability to heal which Gwyn lacks. Moreover, I’m wearing Havel’s armour, the heaviest in the game so I can afford to take multiple hits before I even think about retreating to heal. He doesn’t even harass me as I drink my Estus, like the giant duo Ornstein & Smough. I’m thrilled when he’s dead initially. I’ve beaten an extremely tough game and concluded one of my best experiences in videogames overall. When I’m watching the credits, though, I’m left to wonder: did I play Dark Souls wrong?

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