Final Fantasy XII’s Wasted Combat

In Final Fantasy XII, players win or lose battles before they begin. Contrary to most conventional strategy game design, Final Fantasy XII charges players with devising a plan before combat which your party later executes. You choose instructions for your party of four adventurers in a menu based on simple ‘If’ statements; in battle each party member follows their own instructions to the best of their ability. Often, that might be as simple as attacking the nearest enemy. However, it’s also possible to give them more complex directions, like healing allies who fall below a specified health threshold, or attacking enemies who target the party archer. Fights are less about thinking quickly and more about testing out a machine you’ve already built. It’s as much Opus Magnum as it is a conventional RPG.

It is a tremendous idea which has potential only partially realised in game. Writing a battle plan is extremely fun, but the system can only work to the best of its ability if the challenges are serious and the options for overcoming them are numerous. Final Fantasy fails to meet both of these conditions. Combat is rarely difficult, and even when an enemy makes trouble, it’s usually cause for grinding in the wilderness rather than rethinking your tactics. The game also does its best to lock off options from players, to drip-feed basic instruction sets, and even to limit the number of instructions that can be given.

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4 of the Best 2017: Horizon: Zero Dawn

Horizon: Zero Dawn is, aside from Bloodborne, the best PS4 game. Guerrilla Games, the developer of Horizon, have done a spectacular job making the main activity in the game – hunting machines that resemble animals – thrilling and challenging. Not content to make one great system, though, Horizon also has one of the best open worlds ever devised: a stunningly beautiful, expansive world with a compelling fiction that’s a joy to traverse. When I get a quest in Horizon I’m simultaneously excited to explore a beautiful landscape, hunt machines, and resolve a story I’m confident will be well told. Horizon is a well written game. Every tribe you encounter are fascinating, and unravelling how their culture works and fits with the others is a compelling mystery. Aloy, the protagonist, is a likeable companion, someone whose curiosity about the world around them matches the player’s. She’s as well written as she is performed, likely to be remembered as one of the stars of this generation of consoles.

There’s a rhythm to meeting a new machine in Horizon. You scan it, scout its patrol route, place traps, engage it and remove key components. When you’ve killed it you gather material from its body to improve your equipment. The best fight I had in the game was against a Scorcher, one of the first machines I found in the Frozen Wilds, a new area added in the expansion to Horizon. Because I was running in a blizzard, the Scorcher saw me before I saw it. My first indication that there was an enemy nearby was the red exclamation point indicating you’ve been spotted, followed by a growl.

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4 of The Best 2017: Elite Dangerous

The immediate impression Elite Dangerous makes is that it’s a very complicated game. The core of the game, flying a spaceship from station to station, easily becomes lost in the sea of systems the game drowns you in when you begin. What I love about Elite, though, is how accomplished flying is. It’s supremely satisfying to drop out of warp, to request docking permission from station security, to execute the perfect landing, to plot the optimum route to your next stop. Elite is a game of routine so it’s a good job Frontier, the developer, have done such a stellar job making every part of that routine the best it can be. I played Elite Dangerous in 2017 but it was first released in 2014. This year saw the game change dramatically plus it was released on PS4, so I feel comfortable including it here.

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4 of The Best 2017: Opus Magnum

I haven’t finished Opus Magnum. When I play most games I finish them quickly if I like them; with Opus Magnum I love it too much to move on. Opus Magnum is a puzzle game. You build machines that combine, transport and transmute elements to solve problems. In most puzzle games, I finish a puzzle and move on to the next, so I can see the challenge and start thinking. Opus Magnum’s changed that. Every machine that does its job can be made more efficient. It can work more quickly using less space and fewer parts. It took about ten minutes to solve the game’s first simple puzzle, Stabilized Water, but since I completed it I’ve returned three times with ideas about how it can be modified and made more elegant. Opus Magnum’s made me play differently, and that’s remarkable.

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4 of the Best 2017: GWENT

If you’ve followed this blog for a long time, you’ll have noticed there were fewer posts in 2017 than any previous year. Mostly, that’s because I didn’t have time to play games. I graduated, changed jobs, moved house, and dealt with other life events too boring to narrate here. I haven’t played enough to do a proper top five list, but over the next few days I want to celebrate four of the best games I did play.

Gwent, of course, is cheating. I’ve written about how much I love it here and on Rock, Paper, Shotgun already. I’m not tired of praising it, though, and that’s a testament to just how spectacular it is.

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Sorry About The Emptiness + Spam

Hey. I’ve been out of the country recently, and while I was gone there was a) no posts and b) thousands and thousands of spam comments. Sorry about that! I didn’t write anything to be queued up for release, as I should have done, and also my spam protection expired and I didn’t notice. It should be fixed now.

See you soon!

Hoplite’s Poor Progression

Hoplite is a mobile game in which you play the titular hoplite, descending through hell to retrieve the golden fleece and beat your high score. The game is played on a hex grid: each turn, you move one space and when you make a move, so too do all the enemies. If you move into the hex beside an enemy or if you pass them, you kill them, but if you end your turn in a hex beside you they hurt you. When you complete a level, you select one upgrade from a list for your hoplite. As the game progresses it introduces enemies with more complex moves and attacks.

Since I’ve been out of the country lately, I’ve been playing a lot of Hoplite on my phone. For the most part it’s an excellent substitute for PC strategy games, and it’s the first roguelike I’ve really loved. However, Hoplite’s progression and upgrade system are tedious. Bizarrely, your first few games of Hoplite will be the least compelling you’ll play, and the game only opens up after you unlock a few achievements. As I mentioned, you pick one upgrade from a randomly generated list every time you successfully clear a level of enemies.

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